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High Phthalates Panel Debunks Myths about Chemicals in Food Packaging

Over the past few years, there is a growing myth about consumer exposure to phthalates through food packaging. According to the myth, phthalates are present in consumer diets due to exposure from plastic food wraps and containers, potentially causing adverse health effects. In reality, phthalates aren’t used in materials such as food wrappers; and food packaging like takeout containers is not “coated” with phthalates, as has inaccurately been stated in some reporting.

In fact, phthalates like di-isononyl phthalate (DINP) and di-isodecyl phthalate (DIDP) continue to be approved for use in food-contact applications (such as vinyl gloves, tubing, and conveyor belts) around the world, including in the United States, European Union, and China. There is overwhelming evidence that these high molecular weight phthalates have been proven safe for their intended use and are permitted in food contact application.

In Case You Missed It, M. David Adenuga and Eileen Conneely recently discussed this topic in their editorial “Fear of Chemicals in Food Packaging Is Unwarranted.” In the piece posted to the Progressive Grocer, Adenuga and Conneely both support the evidence from credible food safety agencies around the world that clearly indicate no findings of risk from phthalates in food.

Learn more by reading “Fear of Chemicals in Food Packaging Is Unwarranted” and learn what the reality is about phthalates in food packaging.

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