American Chemistry Matters: Driving Innovation, Creating Jobs and Enhancing Safety

A ‘great day’ for energy efficiency last month — how about a great year?

Our friends at the Alliance to Save Energy (ASE) hosted their 11th Great Energy Efficiency Day (GEED) event on Capitol Hill last month, bringing together hundreds of stakeholders to discuss the importance of energy efficiency to the U.S. economy and how communities are working toward the goal of doubling energy productivity by 2030.

Notable speakers included Sens. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) and Rob Portman (R-OH), co-sponsors of the Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act (S.1392); Reps. Michael Burgess (R-TX) and David McKinley (R-WV); and Drs. David Danielson and Kathleen Hogan from the Department of Energy.

Panel discussions focused on how private industry is driving energy efficiency, obstacles that must be overcome, and numerous state and local success stories in places like Massachusetts, New York and California.

At the event, Sen. Shaheen waxed optimistic about S. 1392 in particular, saying:

We’ve heard from leadership in the House that if we pass it in the Senate, they will take this up. This can get passed by both houses. This is something we can do now, this year.

In conjunction with GEED, meetings were held with members of Congress throughout the week. Nearly 50 business and state leaders from Michigan, Colorado, Ohio, North Carolina and other states asked their congressmen to support energy efficiency.

Nearly every energy-efficient technology that will help bring us closer to doubling energy productivity by 2030 is made possible by chemistry.

From vehicle and building efficiency, to energy generation and manufacturing processes, to consumer electronics and product packaging – chemistry is creating technologies that empower Americans to increase energy efficiency, making our nation’s energy supplies go further while lowering energy costs for business and families.

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