PPG Industries: Painting the way to more energy-efficient cars and trucks

“One local company that will be all over the Pittsburgh International Auto Show won’t have even have a booth,” reporter Ann Belser wrote in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Belser wasn’t talking in riddles — she was talking about paint!

Chemistry is well-known for helping to create products that empower Americans to improve energy efficiency in their daily lives. And PPG Industries is well-known in the automotive industry for developing some of the most functional paint and coatings chemistry has to offer.

Just last summer, a 1934 Ford roadster in PPG gleaming black paint was named America’s Most Beautiful Roadster at the 62nd Grand National Roadster Show in Pomona, California. The man who helped build the car, Doug Jerger, chose PPG’s Deltron® single-stage DCC Concept® Acrylic Urethane for a reason:

Those guys at PPG have it all together. Their paint always shoots and sprays right and looks great. We use only PPG products, been using them since the shop opened in 1964 and started with Ditzler.

But there’s more to the PPG paint than just brilliance and shine. Many years ago, PPG developed an innovative electrocoating system that mixes electricity with a coating bath, resulting in a high performing finish that “delivers a uniform film build, color consistency, high yield rates and applied cost efficiency,” PPG says.

A brand new electrocoat product — the Enviro-Prime® 7000 — is yet another improvement from its predecessor. It applies the same corrosive protection to a vehicle, but with 20-30 percent less materials. According to Tim Knavish, vice president of Automotive OEM Coatings, this optimized material usage helps car companies cut down on vehicle weight, which means less fuel is required to propel a vehicle, and less emissions are produced.

With a wealth of innovations in energy efficiency, it’s no surprise that a chemistry leader like PPG has received an R&D 100 Award nine times in the last 14 years and has earned an Automotive News PACE Award six times in the last 10 years.

Learn more about chemistry’s contribution to energy efficiency.

Photo via ppg.com

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